Andy's Hearing Sandbox

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HearWell


  1. Is tinnitus just fibrilation of hairs? We "hear" a sound -- an annoying hiss, at high frequency, say; is that hairs activating nerves, or is that nerves imagining hair activation?

    If it's hairs fibrilating, could we construct a defibrilator? Could we give those hairs a shock back to normalcy?

  2. Question:
    (From this site:)

    Loudness of a sound is proportional to the square of the amplitude of the vibration producing the sound. Explain.

    Solution:
    The loudness of sound depends on the amplitude of vibration of the vibrating object. Greater the amplitude of vibration, louder the sound will be.

    When a Sitar string is plucked lightly, then it vibrates with a small amplitude and produces a faint sound or feeble sound. When a sitar string is plucked hard, then it vibrates with a large amplitude and produces a very loud sound.

    The loudness of sound is directly proportional to the square of the amplitude of vibration.

    If the amplitude of vibration is doubled, then the loudness will become 4 times.

    If the amplitude of vibration is halved, then the loudness will become one-fourth.

    The loudness of sound is expressed in the units called the Decibel. The symbol of the decibel is Db.

    At a loudness of above 80 Db, the sound become physically painful. And at about 140 Db level, the sound hurts too much.

  3. Mathematica
  4. Decibel -- a tenth of a Bel, of course!:)

    The decibel (symbol: dB) is a relative unit of measurement equal to one tenth of a bel (B). It expresses the ratio of two values of a power or root-power quantity on a logarithmic scale. Two signals whose levels differ by one decibel have a power ratio of 101/10 (approximately 1.26) or root-power ratio of 101⁄20 (approximately 1.12).

    ....


    Two principal types of scaling of the decibel are in common use. When expressing a power ratio, it is defined as ten times the logarithm in base 10.[5] That is, a change in power by a factor of 10 corresponds to a 10 dB change in level. When expressing root-power quantities, a change in amplitude by a factor of 10 corresponds to a 20 dB change in level. The decibel scales differ by a factor of two, so that the related power and root-power levels change by the same value in linear systems, where power is proportional to the square of amplitude.

  5. Joe's suggestions:
  6. I did a search for Mathematica and hearing tests, and found a few interesting articles:

  7. Went looking for Mathematica synthesizers, and
  8. Encylopedia Britanica has a good article on sound

  9. I’d said I’d look into analysis for python and R: here are some early looks

  10. Soundmagic Spectral:
    • "SoundMagic Spectral is a freeware suite of 23 Audio Unit plug-ins that implement real-time spectral processing of sound. This set of effects give you unprecedented control and creativity in the processing of audio, whether from static audio files or live audio streams."
    • Only for the Mac at this time...:(